9 Not So Obvious Things to Ask Your Veterinarian

There’s so much to keep track of when you have pets. Did you give them their meds today? Are they eating well? When was the last time they had a treatment for fleas?

Planning a trip to the vet can be a pretty involved process as well. There’s the scheduling and getting time off from work. Then you have to load up the car, drive there, and wrangle your pets in and out of the clinic.

Be it an annual check-up or a sick visit, there are other things you may want to ask while you are at the office.

If getting your pet to the vet is hectic, it may be good to have a list of your questions ready ahead of time. Here are some suggestions on what to add to your list!

1.) Will My Dog or Cat See the Same Doctor?

If your dog or cat needs special care or is uneasy around new people, it may be particularly important to see the same doctor each time.

Some clinics have rotating veterinarians which means your animal will be with whoever is available.

Knowing the clinic’s policy ahead of time can help you plan ahead.

2.) What Time Is Best to Schedule My Pet?

Usually, when scheduling an appointment, we are looking to synch times and find the time that is most convenient for the human’s schedule.

If you have a cat or a chihuahua, you may want to consider if they frighten easily.

If you have a pet who doesn’t respond well to loud noises like barking or doesn’t get along well with other animals, you might ask for a slot during a less busy time.

This will make things easier for you, the staff and more importantly for your animal.

If the best time for your pet to come in for an appointment is at a time that is inconvenient for you, don’t dismay! We can arrange transportation to the vet in Columbus. Call or text us at (614) 439-1621

 

3.) What Do I Do For Emergencies or Surgeries?

It’s good to plan for the “what-ifs.”

Ask your vet what emergency care facility your animal should go to if they don’t already have such a facility.

You may also want to ask where they refer patients for surgical care.

Work together on an emergency plan.

4.) How Can I Reduce Costs?

Money can be an uncomfortable conversation for people. However many families are on a budget.

It’s likely you aren’t the first person to ask about how to keep expenses low.

Ask about discounts, or what alternative treatments may be cheaper.

Sometimes medications intended for humans can be given to animals and wind up costing less. Ask the vet what safe, lower-cost substitutions are available.

You may be lucky and work with a clinic that has some money-saving tricks up their sleeve.

5.) Is This Normal?

Animals sometimes do strange things. Some of it may seem insignificant and we’ll just shrug it off.

However, some things we just assume are quirks could be signs of real issues that should be addressed.

Annoying behavior can also be discussed. It may seem like whining to you but think about it. If you can have less annoyance with your pets, you can enjoy one another’s company more.

If your dog barks too much, then mention it. There may be a simple solution that brings peace to both you and your neighbors.

For owners of aging animals, ask what kind of behavior changes you should be on the lookout for such as signs of senility. Also, ask about what additional care your senior pets will need in the near to far future.

6.) Can Anything Be Done About My Pet’s Bathroom Issues?

Smells seem to hit us at random times, don’t they?

You could be getting a stack of blankets off a shelf and smell cat urine all over them. How did he get in there?

Or you’ve settled into bed, your dog laying at the foot. As you read your book, suddenly that smell comes back. You don’t hear them coming, but you smell that flatulence immediately.

While these annoying things you’d rather just put out of your mind, there may be a fix for these foul odor problems that catch you off guard.

You’re not alone. It’s not a silly question. Ask what can be done to reduce these unpleasant surprises.

7.) Is This Store-Bought Product Okay?

Some vets advise against certain over the counter flea treatments as some products may cause seizures.

We may also make the wrong assumptions about other products we buy like shampoos, foods, and treats. Get your vet’s opinion on what products you are introducing to your animal.

Sometimes we make purchase decisions based on what a friend or store clerk says about the product. They may not be aware of certain adverse effects.

Better to be safe than sorry. Bring the package into the clinic or pull it up on your mobile device.

8.) What Should I Know About My Breed?

A packed schedule could mean that the vet staff is just trying to get through their bookings as efficiently as possible.

In this rush, issues that are unique to your animal may not come up.

If you have some information you’ve come across about your pet, go ahead and bring that up. Compare notes. Ask if there is anything else you need to know about your breed of animal.

Come to know what your vet knows. They know a lot.

9.) What Parasites and Pests Are a Problem In Our Area?

Allergists know what problems nature brings for the region they serve. Likewise, there could be a certain issue that is particularly cumbersome in your area.

Ask if there are pests and parasites that are a big problem for area pet owners. Ask what the best prevention is for these issues and what treatments are available should your pet be affected.

There might also be other notable trends going on in the pet community that you might like to be in the loop about.

Get the scoop!

Fur Star Pet Care can lend a helping hand! Contact us about transportation to the vet in Columbus. See our services.
Some of you may only get into talk to the vet once a year during your annual visits, so this is a crucial time to regroup and get a gameplan together about what your pet’s needs will be for the coming year.
Get a pen and paper out and make your list. Tack in on the fridge so you know where it is. One less thing to worry about!

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